Related topics: global warming

Warming in the stratosphere leads to cold winters

In the first week of January, the Arctic stratosphere suddenly warmed up, an occurrence known as "sudden stratospheric warming" (SSW). This phenomenon results in cold winter weather, just the kind we are facing now – ETH ...

Aeolus wows with first wind data

Just one week after ESA's Aeolus satellite shone a light on our atmosphere and returned a taster of what's in store, this ground-breaking mission has again exceeded all expectations by delivering its first data on wind – ...

Hole in ionosphere is caused by sudden stratospheric warming

Forecasting space weather is even more challenging than regular meteorology. The ionosphere—the upper atmospheric layer containing particles charged by solar radiation—affects many of today's vital navigation and communication ...

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Stratosphere

The stratosphere is the second major layer of Earth's atmosphere, just above the troposphere, and below the mesosphere. It is stratified in temperature, with warmer layers higher up and cooler layers farther down. This is in contrast to the troposphere near the Earth's surface, which is cooler higher up and warmer farther down. The border of the troposphere and stratosphere, the tropopause, is marked by where this inversion begins, which in terms of atmospheric thermodynamics is the equilibrium level. The stratosphere is situated between about 10 km (6 miles) and 50 km (31 miles) altitude above the surface at moderate latitudes, while at the poles it starts at about 8 km (5 miles) altitude.

The word stratosphere is from the Greek meaning 'stratified layer'.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA