Related topics: global warming

Extreme weather from the stratosphere

ETH climate researcher Daniela Domeisen has documented how the stratosphere influences extreme weather events. What surprised her was the sheer range of potential impacts. She explains what this means for climate research ...

Why snow days are becoming increasingly rare in the UK

Winter frost fairs were common on the frozen River Thames between the 17th and 19th centuries, but they've become unimaginable in our lifetime. Over decades and centuries, natural variability in the climate has plunged the ...

Iodine may slow ozone layer recovery

A new paper quantifying small levels of iodine in Earth's stratosphere could help explain why some of the planet's protective ozone layer isn't healing as fast as expected.

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Stratosphere

The stratosphere is the second major layer of Earth's atmosphere, just above the troposphere, and below the mesosphere. It is stratified in temperature, with warmer layers higher up and cooler layers farther down. This is in contrast to the troposphere near the Earth's surface, which is cooler higher up and warmer farther down. The border of the troposphere and stratosphere, the tropopause, is marked by where this inversion begins, which in terms of atmospheric thermodynamics is the equilibrium level. The stratosphere is situated between about 10 km (6 miles) and 50 km (31 miles) altitude above the surface at moderate latitudes, while at the poles it starts at about 8 km (5 miles) altitude.

The word stratosphere is from the Greek meaning 'stratified layer'.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA