Porous materials unfavorable for coronavirus survival

As COVID-19 spreads via respiratory droplets, researchers have become increasingly interested in the drying of droplets on impermeable and porous surfaces. Surfaces that accelerate evaporation can decelerate the spread of ...

Disappearance of Utah monolith won't prompt major probe

Police won't be opening a major investigation into the disappearance of a mysterious silver-colored monolith that generated international attention and a mess when curious visitors made their way to the site of the discovery ...

Cooling red-hot steel with warm water

Ph.D. student Camila Gomez mimicked the cooling process of Tata Steel's blast furnaces in the lab and found out that it's better to cool with warmer water.

Stretching makes the superconductor

When people imagine "new materials," they typically think of chemistry. But UConn physicist Ilya Sochnikov has another suggestion: mechanics.

Why we should leave old oil rigs in the sea, and why we don't

Decommissioning the UK's offshore oil and gas infrastructure will cost the taxpayer £24 billion, according to estimates from HMRC. So why can't we leave man-made structures in the sea and thereby save the cost of removal ...

Chromium steel was first made in ancient Persia

Chromium steel—similar to what we know today as tool steel—was first made in Persia, nearly a millennium earlier than experts previously thought, according to a new study led by UCL researchers.

Why shaving dulls even the sharpest of razors

Razors, scalpels, and knives are commonly made from stainless steel, honed to a razor-sharp edge and coated with even harder materials such as diamond-like carbon. However, knives require regular sharpening, while razors ...

page 1 from 21