News tagged with stars

Supermassive black holes found in two tiny galaxies

Three years ago, a University of Utah-led team discovered that an ultra-compact dwarf galaxy contained a supermassive black hole, then the smallest known galaxy to harbor such a giant black hole. The findings suggested that ...

dateApr 17, 2017 in Astronomy
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The lifetimes of massive star-forming regions

Astronomers can roughly estimate how long it takes for a new star to form: it is the time it takes for material in a gas cloud to collapse in free-fall, and is set by the mass, the size of the cloud, and gravity. Although ...

dateApr 17, 2017 in Astronomy
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Hubble sees starbursts in Virgo

Although galaxy formation and evolution are still far from being fully understood, the conditions we see within certain galaxies—such as so-called starburst galaxies—can tell us a lot about how they have evolved over ...

dateApr 14, 2017 in Astronomy
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Earth-sized 'Tatooine' planets could be habitable

With two suns in its sky, Luke Skywalker's home planet Tatooine in "Star Wars" looks like a parched, sandy desert world. In real life, thanks to observatories such as NASA's Kepler space telescope, we know that two-star systems ...

dateApr 12, 2017 in Astronomy
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Collisions generate gas in debris disks

By examining the atomic carbon line from two young star systems—49 Ceti and Beta Pictoris—researchers had found atomic carbon in the disk, the first time this observation has been made at sub-millimeter wavelength, hinting ...

dateApr 12, 2017 in Astronomy
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Black holes theorized in the 18th century

Black holes are not made up of matter, although they have a large mass. This explains why it has not yet been possible to observe them directly, but only via the effect of their gravity on the surroundings. They distort space ...

dateApr 11, 2017 in Astronomy
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Image: Gaia satellite sky scan

This may look like a brightly decorated Easter egg wrapping, but it actually represents how ESA's Gaia satellite scanned the sky during its first 14 months of science operations, between July 2014 and September 2015.

dateApr 11, 2017 in Astronomy
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