Five things to consider before speed limiters are added to cars

The recent announcement that EU rules for fitting speed limiters to new cars from 2022 will be adopted by the UK was welcomed by many, including the European Transport Safety Council, as a move that will save lives. However, ...

EU aims to put speed limit technology on cars

The European Union is moving to require cars and trucks to have technology that would deter speeding as well as data recorders to document the circumstances of accidents.

Increasing the speed limit won't get the traffic moving faster

The UK should raise its motorway speed limit for cars and vans to 80mph as a way of increasing national productivity, a government minister recently suggested. It's a perennial political idea that has already been proposed ...

How smart technology gadgets can avoid speed limits

Speed limits apply not only to traffic. There are limitations on the control of light as well, in optical switches for internet traffic, for example. Physicists at Chalmers University of Technology now understand why it is ...

Quantum speed limits are not actually quantum

Quantum mechanics has fundamental speed limits—upper bounds on the rate at which quantum systems can evolve. However, two groups working independently have published papers showing for the first time that quantum speed ...

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Speed limit

A road speed limit is the maximum speed allowed by law for road vehicles. Speed limits are commonly set and enforced by the legislative bodies of nations or provincial governments, such as countries within the world.

The first maximum speed limit was the 10 miles per hour (16 km/h) limit introduced in the United Kingdom in 1861.

The Isle of Man is the only place in the world that does not have a general speed limit. In Germany, over 50% of the autobahn system remains free from speed limits.

Currently, the highest posted speed limit in the world is 140 kilometres per hour (87 mph) on Polish motorways , although a variable speed limit up to 160 kilometres per hour (99 mph) was permitted experimentally on a stretch of Austrian motorway in June 2006.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA