Related topics: climate change · extinction · plants · biodiversity · plos one

Team discovers invasive-native crayfish hybrids in Missouri

In a study of crayfish in the Current River in southeastern Missouri, researchers discovered—almost by chance—that the virile crayfish, Faxonius virilis, was interbreeding with a native crayfish, potentially altering ...

Vermont bald eagle restoration follows years of trying

Thirteen years after Vermont lost the ignominious distinction of being the only state in the continental United States without any breeding pairs of bald eagles, the state is moving to remove the iconic national symbol from ...

Non-English-language science could help save biodiversity

It is commonly assumed that any important scientific knowledge would be available in English, and so scientific knowledge used in international studies is predominantly sourced from English-language documents. But is this ...

Corals once thought to be a single species are really two

On a night dive off the coast of St. John in the U.S. Virgin Islands in 2016, two coral reef researchers saw something unexpected: A coral colony with slender, waving branches was releasing larvae into the water.

Recent discovery hints at northward shift in fish distribution

The sleeper fish Eleotris oxycephala is found in freshwater streams and estuaries from tropical to temperate zones. The recent discovery of an individual of this species much further north than previously recorded suggests ...

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