Setting a satellite to catch a satellite

The target is set: a large derelict satellite currently silently tumbling its way through low orbit. If all goes to plan, in 2023 it will vanish – and efforts against space debris will have made a giant leap forward.

A giant impact: Solving the mystery of how Mars' moons formed

Where did the two natural satellites of Mars, Phobos and Deimos, come from? For a long time, their shape suggested that they were asteroids captured by Mars. However, the shape and course of their orbits contradict this hypothesis. ...

Europe develops self-removal technology for spacecraft

A new European project has an ambitious goal of cleaning up space for future generations. The Technology for Self-Removal of Spacecraft (TeSeR) program, introduced in May 2016, will develop a prototype for a module that will ...

ESA image: Impact chip

The European-built Cupola was added to the International Space Station in 2010 and continues to provide the best room with a view anywhere.

NASA thinks there's a way to get to Mars in three days

We've achieved amazing things by using chemical rockets to place satellites in orbit, land people on the moon, and place rovers on the surface of Mars. We've even used ion drives to reach destinations further afield in our ...

Giant comets could pose danger to life on Earth

A team of astronomers from Armagh Observatory and the University of Buckingham report that the discovery of hundreds of giant comets in the outer planetary system over the last two decades means that these objects pose a ...

US astronauts testify from Space Station

On his 249th consecutive day in space, U.S. astronaut Scott Kelly told Congress that what he misses most is his friends and family on Earth and the chance to experience nature.

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