Scientists expect evolutionary changes from loud, bright world

Humans take for granted the noise and lights associated with cities and other developments across the landscape.  For other creatures, these noisy and bright conditions lead to changes in behavior and activity such as the ...

Nonlinear physics bridges thoughts to sounds in birdsong

The beautiful sound of birdsongs emerging from the trees is a wonderful example of how much nature can still teach us, even as much about their origins are still mysterious to us. About 40 percent of bird species learn to ...

Even low-level PCBs change bird songs

It may not kill them outright, but low-level PCB (polychlorinated biphenyls) contamination disrupts how some birds sing their songs, report Cornell researchers.

Human speech, jazz and whale song

Jazz musicians riffing with each other, humans talking to each other and pods of killer whales all have interactive conversations that are remarkably similar to each other, new research reveals.

Finches use their own form of grammar in their tweets

(PhysOrg.com) -- In a recent study published in Nature Neuroscience, researchers from the University of Kyoto in Japan have discovered that the tweets of Bengalese finches follow a set of grammatical patterns and rules.

Even singers in the bird world have to deal with cover artists

(PhysOrg.com) -- Two competing species of Amazonian birds use the same songs to communicate with each other, Oxford University scientists have found, the first evidence that convergent evolution can arise through social interactions ...

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