2D material in three dimensions

The carbon material graphene has no well-defined thickness; it merely consists of one single layer of atoms. It is therefore often referred to as a "two-dimensional material." Trying to make a three-dimensional structure ...

Controlling how 'odd couple' surfaces and liquids interact

The wettability of a surface—whether drops of water or another liquid bead up or spread out when they come into contact with it—is a crucial factor in a wide variety of commercial and industrial applications, such as ...

Nanobubbles provide pathway to build better medical devices

Researchers from the University of Sydney Nano Institute and School of Chemistry have revealed that tiny gas bubbles—nanobubbles just 100 billionths of a meter high—form on surfaces in unexpected situations, providing ...

How positively and negatively charged ions behave at interfaces

How positively and negatively charged ions behave at the interface between a solid surface and an aqueous solution has been investigated by researchers from the Cluster of Excellence RESOLV at the Ruhr-Universität Bochum, ...

Chemists develop a fundamentally new mode of adsorption

A research team, led by Northwestern Universitychemists, has made a breakthrough in surface science by introducing a new active mechanism of adsorption. Such adsorption-based phenomena, in which molecules are attracted onto ...

Tiny nanoparticles improve charge transport

Three-dimensional topological insulators are materials that can conduct electric current without resistance—but only on their surface. However, this effect is difficult to measure. This is because these materials usually ...

Watching the ultrafast dance moves of a laser plasma

Great leaps in science and technology have been propelled by recent advances in seeing fast evolving physical phenomena, as they happen. Femtosecond lasers from the infrared to the X-ray region have enabled us to 'watch', ...

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