Quantum Criticality in life's proteins (Update)

(Phys.org)—Stuart Kauffman, from the University of Calgary, and several of his colleagues have recently published a paper on the Arxiv server titled 'Quantum Criticality at the Origins of Life'. The idea of a quantum criticality, ...

Physicists propose explanation for metals behaving badly

(Phys.org) —One of the defining properties of metals is that, the hotter the metal, the worse it conducts electricity. But while most metals obey this inverse relationship between temperature and conductivity in a straightforward ...

Infrared light fills a "gap" in iron-based superconductor research

(Phys.org) —Superconductors are a fascinating group of materials in which electrons can flow with almost zero resistance. They have the potential to revolutionize electronics and power distribution, but no existing superconductors ...

Scientists "waltz" closer to using spintronics in computing

(Phys.org) -- Aiming to use electron spins for storing, transporting and processing information, researchers from IBM and scientists at ETH Zurich, a leading European university, today revealed the first-ever direct mapping ...

Unexpectedly Long-Range Effects in Advanced Magnetic Devices

(PhysOrg.com) -- A tiny grid pattern has led materials scientists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the Institute of Solid State Physics in Russia to an unexpected finding—the surprisingly ...

Researchers add order to polymer gels

Gel-like materials have a wide range of applications, especially in chemistry and medicine. However, their usefulness is sometimes limited by their inherent random and disordered nature. Researchers from the University of ...

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Solid-state physics

Solid-state physics, the largest branch of condensed matter physics, is the study of rigid matter, or solids, through methods such as quantum mechanics, crystallography, electromagnetism and metallurgy. Solid-state physics considers how the large-scale properties of solid materials result from their atomic-scale properties. Solid-state physics thus forms the theoretical basis of materials science, as well as having direct applications, for example in the technology of transistors and semiconductors.

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