Researchers develop a way to funnel solar energy

(PhysOrg.com) -- Using carbon nanotubes (hollow tubes of carbon atoms), MIT chemical engineers have found a way to concentrate solar energy 100 times more than a regular photovoltaic cell. Such nanotubes could form antennas ...

European space company wants solar power plant in space

(PhysOrg.com) -- EADS Astrium, Europe's biggest space company, plans to put a solar power satellite in orbit to demonstrate the collection of solar power in space and its transmission via infrared laser to provide electricity ...

New method to make gallium arsenide solar cells

(PhysOrg.com) -- A new "transfer-printing" method of making light-sensitive semiconductors could make solar cells, night-vision cameras, and a range of other devices much more efficient, and could transform the solar industry.

Superconducting and ferroelectric properties of perovskite

(Phys.org) —Perovskite materials are the newest contender for breaking the silicon ceiling in solar cell technology. But they don't just absorb light. Cambridge researchers have found they emit it like a laser, opening ...

Japan firm develops 'sun-chasing' solar panels

A new Japanese solar power device can generate twice the electricity of current models thanks to moving mirrors that follow the sun throughout the day, according to its developers.

The topolariton, a new half-matter, half-light particle

A new type of "quasiparticle" theorized by Caltech's Gil Refael, a professor of theoretical physics and condensed matter theory, could help improve the efficiency of a wide range of photonic devices—technologies, such as ...

Microwave oven cooks up solar cell material

University of Utah metallurgists used an old microwave oven to produce a nanocrystal semiconductor rapidly using cheap, abundant and less toxic metals than other semiconductors. They hope it will be used for more efficient ...

Engineer pursues biological solar power

A Binghamton University engineering researcher designed a biological solar cell that's a million times more effective than current technology. Preliminary data on Seokheun "Sean" Choi's next advancement is a thousand times ...

Future looks bright for carbon nanotube solar cells

(Phys.org) —In an approach that could challenge silicon as the predominant photovoltaic cell material, University of Wisconsin-Madison materials engineers have developed an inexpensive solar cell that exploits carbon nanotubes ...

Turning windows into powerplants

If a new development from labs at MIT pans out as expected, someday the entire surface area of a building’s windows could be used to generate electricity — without interfering with the ability to see through them.

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