Manta rays form social bonds with each other

Manta rays form social relationships and actively choose their social partners, a new study has revealed. Research published today by scientists from the Marine Megafauna Foundation, Macquarie University and the University ...

Understanding social structure is important to rewilding

Increasing the success of wildlife translocations is critical, given the escalating global threats to wildlife. A study published in May 2019 in the journal Global Ecology and Conservation highlights the influence of a species' ...

Let's mimic termite nests to keep human buildings cool

When it comes to building sustainable buildings, humans have a lot to learn from termites. A recent study that colleagues and I published in Science Advances explains how some African termites maintain cool and stable temperatures ...

How human networks drive inequality, social immobility

To understand why people succeed or fail, look at their circle of friends. Like it or not, said Stanford economist Matthew Jackson, people's fates are closely connected to their human networks.

Bee dispersal ability may influence conservation measures

The abilities of various bee species to disperse influences the pattern of their population's genetic structure, which, in turn, can constrain how they respond to environmental change, as reported by an international team ...

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