A study in scarlet Japanese macaques

From peacocks to butterflies and betta fish, mother nature never disappoints when it colors the males of a species. Which makes sense, in species with traditional sex roles, males are more involved in competing for mates, ...

For hyenas, there's no 'I' in clan

When it comes to advancing social status, it's not what you know, it's who you know—for humans and spotted hyenas alike.

Uncertainty about your social rank might be bad for your health

Having strong social connections has many benefits, from splitting the tab on a pizza to having someone with whom to binge watch Netflix. But for rhesus macaque monkeys at the California National Primate Research Center (CNPRC) ...

Wolves howl because they care

When a member of the wolf pack leaves the group, the howling by those left behind isn't a reflection of stress but of the quality of their relationships. So say researchers based on a study of nine wolves from two packs living ...

Study finds monkey mothers are key to sons' reproductive success

If you are a male human, nothing puts a damper on romantic success like having your mother in tow. If you are a male northern muriqui monkey, however, mom's presence may be your best bet to find and successfully mate with ...

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