Researchers 3-D print electronics and cells directly on skin

In a groundbreaking new study, researchers at the University of Minnesota used a customized, low-cost 3D printer to print electronics on a real hand for the first time. The technology could be used by soldiers on the battlefield ...

Functional nerve cells from skin cells

A new method of generating mature nerve cells from skin cells could greatly enhance understanding of neurodegenerative diseases, and could accelerate the development of new drugs and stem cell-based regenerative medicine.

Scientists convert skin cells to beating heart cells

Scripps Research Institute scientists have converted adult skin cells directly into beating heart cells efficiently without having to first go through the laborious process of generating embryonic-like stem cells. The powerful ...

Studying diseases with better delivery of gene-editing tools

Stem cells can be used to study the effects of disease on numerous tissue types due to their pluripotency, or ability to produce cells of any type. But using gene-editing tools with them can be challenging, according to Xiaojun ...

Landing therapeutic genes safely in the human genome

Many future gene and cell therapies to treat diseases like cancer, rare genetic and other conditions could be enhanced in their efficacy, persistence, and predictability by so-called "genomic safe harbors (GSHs)." These are ...

Basement membrane underpins tissue interactions in the skin

In a discovery that could pave the way for therapies that promote wound healing and alleviate skin diseases, RIKEN researchers have found that the network of molecules under the outermost layer of mouse skin, the skin epithelium, ...

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Skin disease

Dermatosis (plural dermatoses), a noun, is defined as "any disease of the skin," and, while thousands of skin disorders have been described, only a small number account for most visits to the doctor. Uncommon presentations of common diseases are common.

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