Showing that species thrive through social connections

The term biodiversity invites images of lush rainforests, dynamic estuaries, and other biomes where a kaleidoscope of species interact within their communities. We could assume the same holds true for biodiversity at the microscopic level.

Resurrecting a 'lost' coral species

With about one-third of the world's corals currently under threat of extinction due to climate change, Curtin researchers have made the encouraging discovery of a "lost" species of coral that had been hidden for more than ...

A new 225-million-year-old reptile from Brazil

Maehary bonapartei represents a small reptile that is considered to be the most basal of the evolutionary lineage that gave rise to pterosaurs. A study in PeerJ focuses on this latest find while also demonstrating that Faxinalipterus ...

New dung beetle species on Australian soil

The Dung Beetle Ecosystem Engineer (DBEE) project reached a major milestone last month—the arrival of a new dung beetle species, Gymnopleurus sturmi, on Australian shores. It is the third and final dung beetle species imported ...

Tree sensors track urban growth, flowering and more

Low-cost "tree fitbits" can pinpoint the precise timing of tree activities, like spring bloom or autumn leaf change, according to a new CU Boulder study. Researchers outfitted two East Boulder ash trees with high-resolution ...

Some mammals shift their schedules in urban environments

When visiting cities, coyotes seem to prefer the nightlife while deer and squirrels would rather be home before dark. That's the finding of new research from University of Utah ("the U") scientists who found that mammals ...

Researchers discover yeast self-destruct pathway

The cells of some yeast species undergo what appears to be a self-destruct process following certain kinds of stress, according to a new study from researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

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