Environmentally friendly procedure developed for extracting silver

Silver can now be extracted ecologically and more efficiently than before. Researchers at Lappeenranta University of Technology (LUT) extracted silver from a process stream using an environmentally friendly ion exchange technique. ...

Safer than silver: Antibacterial material made with algae

Consumers concerned about safety of silver ions in antibacterial and odor-free clothing will soon have a proven safe alternative thanks to ultra-thin thread and a substance found naturally in red algae.

Silver coating kills bacteria on campus door handles

Can a door handle keep you healthy? That depends on what's on it. Most are teeming with bacteria: staph, E. coli, Enterococcus and sometimes even Salmonella. That stuff can make you sick.

Spinning up antibacterial silver on glass

The antibacterial effects of silver are well established. Now, researchers at Yonsei University in Seoul, Republic of Korea, have developed a technique to coat glass with a layer of silver ions that can prevent growth of ...

Is nanosilver toxic?

According to Finnish-Estonian joint research with data obtained on two crustacean species, there is apparently no reason to consider silver nanoparticles more dangerous for aquatic ecosystems than silver ions. The results ...

Eco-safe antibacterial fibre discovered

(Phys.org)—Researchers at KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm have discovered an antibacterial polymer that can be used in everyday products such as sportswear, diapers and bandages, without causing resistant ...

A nano end for Christmas tree needles

As Twelfth Night approaches and the Christmas decorations start to look increasingly congruous as the last crumbs of cake are swept away and the remnants of the turkey have finally been consumed, there is the perennial question ...

Nanosilver from clothing can pose major environmental problems

(Phys.org)—Silver nanoparticles can have a severe environmental impact if their utilisation in clothing continues to increase. If everyone buys one silver nanoparticle-treated sock a year, the silver concentration in waste ...

Ions, not particles, make silver toxic to bacteria

(Phys.org) -- Rice University researchers have settled a long-standing controversy over the mechanism by which silver nanoparticles, the most widely used nanomaterial in the world, kill bacteria.

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