Bioceramics power the mantis shrimp's famous punch

Researchers in Singapore can now explain what gives the mantis shrimp, a marine crustacean that hunts by battering its prey with its club-like appendages, the most powerful punch in the animal kingdom. In a paper publishing ...

Study challenges concerns around imported farmed shrimp

Scientists at the University of Stirling have challenged concerns around the consumption of imported farmed shrimp – with new research indicating that it is as safe as any other seafood product.

Shrimp talent quest finds a winner

Shrimp help keep fish clean—and scientists have identified the 'cleaner shrimp' with the most talent for reducing parasites and chemical use in farmed fish.

Shrimp heal injured fish

James Cook University scientists have discovered that shrimp help heal injured fish.

A cooler ocean predator than sharks? Consider the mantis shrimps

When you think about fearsome predators in the ocean, the first thing that pops into your mind is probably a shark. Sure, sharks are OK, with their sleek, menacing shape and their gaping jaws with rows of jagged teeth. But ...

Strategic strikes by mantis shrimp smash shells selectively

For a tiny crustacean, Caribbean rock mantis shrimp (Neogonodactylus bredini) pack a ferocious punch. Bludgeoning the shells of snails and other crustaceans to gain access to the tasty snail within, mantis shrimp flick their ...

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