Part-organic invention can be used in bendable mobile phones

Engineers at ANU have invented a semiconductor with organic and inorganic materials that can convert electricity into light very efficiently, and it is thin and flexible enough to help make devices such as mobile phones bendable.

Cost-saving computer chips get smaller than ever

Not so long ago, a computer filled a whole room and radio receivers were as big as washing machines. In recent decades, electronic devices have shrunk considerably in size and this trend is expected to continue, leading to ...

Semiconductor technology for particle accelerators

Corporate Technology (CT), Siemens global research department, has developed a new accelerator technology in cooperation with one of its strategic partners, the Russian research center Skolkovo, which is located near Moscow.

Cooled integrated circuit amplifies with lowest noise so far

Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, have demonstrated an integrated amplifier with the lowest noise performance so far. The amplifier offers new possibilities for detecting the faintest electromagnetic ...

Speeding up electronics to light frequencies

(Phys.org)—Modern information processing allows for breathtaking switching rates of about a 100 billion cycles per second. New results from the Laboratory for Attosecond Physics (LAP) of Prof. Ferenc Krausz (Max Planck ...

Silicon nanophotonics: Using light signals to transmit data

(Phys.org)—IBM announced today a major advance in the ability to use light instead of electrical signals to transmit information for future computing. The breakthrough technology – called "silicon nanophotonics" – allows ...

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