Martian rock arrangement not alien handiwork

At first, figuring out how pebble-sized rocks organize themselves in evenly-spaced patterns in sand seemed simple and even intuitive. But once Andrew Leier, an assistant geoscience professor at the U of C, started observing, ...

How the world's rivers are changing

The way rivers function is significantly affected by how much sediment they transport and where it gets deposited. River sediment—mostly sand, silt, and clay—plays a critical ecological role, as it provides habitat for ...

Defects in quartz crystal structure reveal the origin of dust

Global warming and a progressively drier climate in many parts of the world are causing more dust storms. To predict how these storms are caused, researchers are looking into the past to understand where the dust came from, ...

Seismic signals allow researchers to see under river ice

River scientists from Sweden, Finland and Germany report detailed measurements of sediment movement and water level in an ice-covered river using a novel technique—seismic signals. The results are published in the Journal ...

Yellow River formula addresses flood risk, sustainability

U.S. and Chinese geologists studying China's Yellow River have created a new tool that could help Chinese officials better predict and prevent the river's all-too-frequent floods, which threaten as many as 80 million people. ...

Thawing ice makes the Alps grow

The Alps are steadily "growing" by about one to two millimeters per year. Likewise, the formerly glaciated subcontinents of North America and Scandinavia are also undergoing constant upward movement. This is due to the fact ...

Charting the slopes of sediment transport

In the Earth Surface Dynamics Lab at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) the behavior of rivers is modeled through the use of artificial rivers—flumes—through which water can be pumped at varying rates over ...

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