Loss of land-based vertebrates is accelerating, study finds

In 2015, Stanford biologist Paul Ehrlich coauthored a study declaring the world's sixth mass extinction was underway. Five years later, Ehrlich and colleagues at other institutions have a grim update: the extinction rate ...

The hidden underwater map of the past

Major climate changes leading to great fluctuations in sea levels took place during the Quaternary period 2.58 million years ago. The sea receded during the glaciations, because the water ended up stored in huge ice masses; ...

Two vital buffers against climate change are just offshore

A new study finds that about 31 million people worldwide live in coastal regions that are "highly vulnerable" to future tropical storms and sea-level rise driven by climate change. In some of those regions, however, powerful ...

Study explores how Native Americans used sea otters

University of Oregon scientists are probing archaeological evidence for how indigenous peoples used sea otters, and their findings could help Alaskans confront growing numbers of the mammals and Oregonians who want to reintroduce ...

Piecing together the Dead Sea Scrolls with DNA evidence

The collection of more than 25,000 fragments of ancient manuscripts known as the Dead Sea Scrolls include, among other ancient texts, the oldest copies of books of the Hebrew Bible. But finding a way to piece them all together ...

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Sea

The term sea refers to certain large amounts of water, but there is inconsistency as to its precise definition and application. Most commonly, a sea may refer to a large expanse of saline water connected with an ocean, but it is also used sometimes for a large saline lake that lacks a natural outlet, e.g. the Caspian Sea. Colloquially, the term is used as a synonym for ocean. Additionally, large lakes, such as the Great Lakes of North America, are occasionally referred to as "inland seas".

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