Heatwave devastates wildlife populations in World Heritage Site

Large numbers of dugongs, sea snakes and other marine animals disappeared from the UNESCO World Heritage Site Shark Bay, Western Australia, after a heat wave devastated seagrass meadows, according to recently released research.

Sea turtles struggle years after unexplained die-off

New research is detailing how environmental stressors, including heavy metals, brought on by human activity are harming coastal green sea turtle populations—work that researchers hope will inform conservation efforts going ...

The wider impact of illegal wildlife trade

Next month, world leaders will gather in London at the 2018 Illegal Wildlife Trade conference with the aim of stimulating the greater political commitment needed to stamp out wildlife crime.

The taste for turtle and the disappearing delicacy

It was the 1850s and people were hungry. They were moving by the thousands to northern California to strike it rich during the Gold Rush, but their appetite wasn't just for precious metal, it was for basic food—there wasn't ...

Rising temperatures turning major sea turtle population female

Scientists have used a new research approach to show that warming temperatures are turning one of the world's largest sea turtle colonies almost entirely female, running the risk that the colony cannot sustain itself in coming ...

Most sea turtles now female in north Great Barrier Reef

The vast majority of green sea turtles in the northern Great Barrier Reef are now female because of warmer temperatures due to climate change, which influences their sex during incubation, researchers said Monday.

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