Related topics: climate change · arctic · nasa · ice · satellite

A relationship between severe winter weather and Arctic warmth?

A new review article published in Nature Climate Change evaluates whether severe winter weather in the United States, Europe and Asia is sensitive to Arctic temperatures. The lead author is NSF-funded scientist Judah Cohen, ...

Quo vadis Antarctic bottom water?

Ocean currents are essential for the global distribution of heat and thus also for climate on earth. For example, oxygen is transferred into the deep sea through the formation of new deep water around Antarctica. Weddell ...

Meet the narwhal, 'unicorn of the sea'

Narwhals are often called the unicorns of the sea. The long tusk of the male narwhal sets these whales apart, but it's not the only thing that makes Monodon monoceros among the most intriguing and mysterious marine mammals.

Cracks in Arctic sea ice turn low clouds on and off

The prevailing view has been that more leads are associated with more low-level clouds during winter. But University of Utah atmospheric scientists noticed something strange in their study of these leads: when lead occurrence ...

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Sea ice

Sea ice is formed from ocean water that freezes. Because the oceans consist of saltwater, this occurs at about -1.8 °C (28.8 °F).

Sea ice may be contrasted with icebergs, which are chunks of ice shelves or glaciers that calve into the ocean. Icebergs are compacted snow and hence fresh water.

Sea ice may be deliberately created or manipulated, see Arctic geoengineering for details.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA