Want effective policy? Ask the locals

As multinational organizations such as the United Nations strive to improve life for people across the globe through initiatives like the Sustainable Development Goals, there is a tendency to look for indicators that can ...

Support for democracy linked to income inequality

Voter satisfaction with democracy may have less to do with who actually wins an election and more to do with income inequality, or the gap between rich and poor, indicates a new study by Michigan State University political ...

Maori world view leads to greater life satisfaction

New research from Massey University has compared work/life balance and life satisfaction levels across seven cultures – and found that New Zealand Māori scored the highest on both fronts.

Having children later makes parents happy

Children can be a source of delight, and then in the next moment leave their parents feeling completely exasperated. Thus, the answers to the question of whether having children leads to happiness have varied. A new study ...

Genes play a key part in the recipe for a happy country

Why are the Danes naturally more cheerful than the Brits, and why are we in turn more upbeat than the French? Research presented as part of this year's ESRC Festival of Social Sciences shows us that the recipe behind a happy ...

2013 HILDA report sounds the alarm on child poverty

Australian children under the care of just one parent are three times more likely than other children to live in poverty, new data from Australia's most comprehensive household survey has revealed.

Pollution makes Europeans unhappy

Researchers in Canada have found a correlation between air pollution and people's happiness. Their deep analysis, reported in the latest issue of the International Journal of Green Economics, suggests that air pollution may ...

City life trumps tree change

Inner city Australians enjoy a higher standard of living, higher incomes and are more socially engaged than their suburban and rural counterparts, according to new research from UNSW's Social Policy Research Centre (SPRC).

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