Pollution forms an invisible barrier for marine life

Over 50 percent of the population in the United States and over 60 percent in the world live in coastal areas. Rapidly growing human populations near the ocean have massively altered coastal water ecosystems.

Oceans where fishes choke

(PhysOrg.com) -- Australian marine scientists have expressed disquiet over the continued worldwide spread of large, dead zones in the ocean.

Channels from Mars Hale Crater

(PhysOrg.com) -- This image from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter shows channels to the southeast of Hale crater on southern Mars. Taken by the orbiter's High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera, this ...

In search of wildlife-friendly biofuels

When society jumps on a bandwagon, even for a good cause, there may be unintended consequences. The unintended consequence of crop-based biofuels may be the loss of wildlife habitat, particularly that of the birds who call ...

GPS helps locate soil erosion pathways

Grassed waterways are placed in agricultural fields where runoff water tends to concentrate because they can substantially reduce soil erosion. Mapping techniques that help identify where erosion channels will likely form ...

Study shows green roofs could reduce indoor air pollution

Green roofs – roofs that are planted with vegetation—may improve the indoor air quality of commercial buildings by cutting the amount of ozone coming into the buildings from the outside, according to new research from ...

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