Large boulders help shape huge canyons, researchers find

Anyone who enjoys whitewater rafting in places like the Colorado River owes a debt of gratitude to the enormous boulders that create the foaming undulation known as rapids, and new research appears to shed more light on how ...

Old Man River's unique chemical signature

Human activity greatly impacts the natural chemistry of the largest river in North America—the Mississippi River. In a new, large-scale study, geologists at Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge have identified a unique ...

By river, ocean, or wind, rocks round the same way

The milky, smooth texture of beach glass evokes a history of turbulent transport, rough edges abraded away to produce curves. The same smooth features can be seen in river rocks and dune sands.

Chemical weathering controls erosion rates in rivers

Chemical weathering can control how susceptible bedrock in river beds is to erosion, according to new research. In addition to explaining how climate can influence landscape erosion rates, the results also may improve scientists' ...

Study reveals how climate influences sediment size

In a new paper published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), San Francisco State University Professor of Earth and Climate Sciences Leonard Sklar and colleagues show how two established ...

Chesapeake Bay impact crater adds to sea level rise

Scientists say sea level rise is occurring at a faster pace in the Chesapeake Bay region than the global average, and the dramatic formation of the bay itself is a significant reason why.

Something old, something new... Grand Canyon surprises

The Grand Canyon as we know it was formed between five and six million years ago, which is youthful in geological terms, but parts of it could be as old as 70 million years, scientists said Sunday.

Changing river chemistry affects Eastern US water supplies

Human activities are changing the basic chemistry of many rivers in the Eastern U.S. in ways that have potentially major consequences for urban water supplies and aquatic ecosystems, a University of Maryland-led study has ...

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