What drives circadian rhythms in the polar regions?

In temperate latitudes, the right timing is crucial for almost all living things: Plants sprout with the advent of spring, bees know the best times to visit flowers, people get tired in the evening and wake up again in the ...

Scientists discover skin keeps time independent of the brain

Squids, octopuses, cuttlefish, amphibians, and chameleon lizards are among the animals that can change the color of their skin in a blink of an eye. They have photoreceptors in their skin that operate independently of their ...

Bumble bee workers sleep less while caring for young

All animals, including insects, need their sleep. Or do they? That's the question researchers reporting October 3 in the journal Current Biology are exploring in sleep studies of a surprising group of subjects: brood-tending ...

Disrupting key protein alters biological rhythms in water flea

Researchers from North Carolina State University have shown that the E75 protein is a key regulator of some biological rhythms through interactions with nitric oxide. Suppression of E75 results in longer molt cycles and reduced ...

The role of GABA neurons in the central circadian clock

The research team led by Dr. Daisuke Ono and Prof. Akihiro Yamanaka of the Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya University, along with collaborators, has revealed that inhibitory neurons (GABAergic neurons) of the central ...

Researchers show evidence of cellular clocks in cells

One of nature's most familiar phenomena is collective behavior—fish swimming in schools, locusts marching together, birds flocking. The same thing happens in humans, with individual cells synchronizing into circadian rhythms, ...

Finding a gene that regulates sleep

What keeps us awake—and helps us fall asleep? The answer is complex, but involves what are called circadian rhythms, which are found in all species with sleep-wake cycles—physical, mental, and behavioral changes that ...

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