Seed beetle 'kicks' sign of antagonistic coadaptation

New research from The University of Western Australia's Centre for Evolutionary Biology has found evolutionary kicking behaviour of female seed beetles (Callosobruchus maculatus) has been 'hi-jacked' by males to promote their ...

Birds choose sweet-smelling mates

For most animals, scent is the instant messenger of choice for quickly exchanging personal profiles. Scientists, however, have long dismissed birds as odor-eschewing luddites that don't take advantage of scent-based communications.

Do hens have friends? It seems not

(Phys.org)—A Royal Veterinary College study has found that hens reared in commercial conditions do not form friendships and are not particular about who they spend time with.

The colour of love: Zebrafish perform colorful courtship displays

Billy Ocean may not have been thinking of fish when he wrote "The Color of Love", but Sophie Hutter, Attila Hettyey, Dustin Penn, and Sarah Zala from the Konrad Lorenz Institute of Ethology of the University of Veterinary ...

Promiscuous squid fatigued after mating: study

(Phys.org) -- In order to pass on their genes, southern dumpling squid engage in up to three hours of mating with each partner, but University of Melbourne researchers have found that this results in a reduced ability to ...

A new role is hatched for female fruit flies

A team of New York University biologists has uncovered a previously unknown role for a set of cells within the female reproductive tract of fruit flies that affects the functioning of sperm and hence fertility. Their discovery, ...

Females choose mates for their personalities, study shows

Adventurous females choose mates with similar personalities, regardless of the male's appearance and other assets, according to research led by the University of Exeter. This is the first study to show that the non-sexual ...

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