Dense stellar clusters may foster black hole megamergers

When LIGO's twin detectors first picked up faint wobbles in their respective, identical mirrors, the signal didn't just provide first direct detection of gravitational waves—it also confirmed the existence of stellar binary ...

Relativistic effects on long-range interactions between objects

A team led by researchers María José Caturla and Carlos Untiedt, from the University of Alicante Department of Applied Physics, have studied the importance of relativistic effects on long-range interactions between objects. ...

NASA team studies middle-aged Sun by tracking motion of Mercury

Like the waistband of a couch potato in midlife, the orbits of planets in our solar system are expanding. It happens because the Sun's gravitational grip gradually weakens as our star ages and loses mass. Now, a team of NASA ...

Einstein in an iron crystal

Tiny relativistic effects form the basis of the functionalities in modern technology, as exemplified in magnetic hard disks and data storage media. Now for the first time, scientists have directly observed features in an ...

Fast-moving invisibility cloaks become visible

(Phys.org)—Physicists have found that invisibility cloaks that can achieve perfect invisibility when not in motion will become visible when moving at speeds of around thousands of meters per second. This is because invisibility ...

Simulations reveal an unusual death for ancient stars

(Phys.org) —Certain primordial stars—those 55,000 and 56,000 times the mass of our Sun, or solar masses—may have died unusually. In death, these objects—among the Universe's first-generation of stars—would have ...

How to test the twin paradox without using a spaceship

Forget about anti-ageing creams and hair treatments. If you want to stay young, get a fast spaceship. That is what Einstein's Theory of Relativity predicted a century ago, and it is commonly known as "twin paradox".

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