Blue-eyed shags survived Ice Age in New Zealand

The genetic whakapapa of New Zealand's blue-eyed shags stretches back millions of years—outliving their close relatives throughout the Ice Age—University of Otago research has found.

Uncovering the underlying patterns in contemporary evolution

Wild populations must continuously adapt to environmental changes or risk extinction. For more than fifty years, scientists have described instances of "rapid evolution" in specific populations as their traits (phenotypes) ...

Rethinking the wild world of species diversity in microbes

University of Maryland biologists developed the first mathematical simulations of bacterial communities that incorporate the complex interactions and rapid evolution among bacteria and reflect the tremendous species diversity ...

Evolutionary 'arms race' may help keep cell division honest

Eggs and sperm are special cells for many reasons, but one of the characteristics that sets them apart is that unlike other human cells, which have two copies of 23 chromosomes, one from the mother and one from the father, ...

Deadly white-nose syndrome changed genes in surviving bats

Scientists have found genetic differences between bats killed by white-nose syndrome and bats that survived, suggesting that survivors rapidly evolve to resist the fungal disease, according to a Rutgers-led study with big ...

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