3-D-printed plastics with high performance electrical circuits

Rutgers engineers have embedded high performance electrical circuits inside 3-D-printed plastics, which could lead to smaller and versatile drones and better-performing small satellites, biomedical implants and smart structures.

In-situ chemistry studies for ┬ÁSR

Because of the chemical analogy between muonium (a bound muon-electron system) and hydrogen, the muon technique offers a valuable method for exploring many mechanisms in chemistry and chemical physics. The technique provides ...

Space station's data rate increase supports future exploration

NASA recently doubled the rate at which data from the International Space Station returns to Earth, paving the way for similar future upgrades on Gateway, NASA's upcoming outpost in lunar orbit, and other exploration missions. ...

Scientists develop filter to suppress radio interference

Researchers from Siberian Federal University and Kirensky Institute of Physics have proposed a new design for a multimode stripline resonator. The use of such resonators allows scientists to create miniature band-pass filters ...

Radio galaxy 3C 236 investigated with LOFAR

Using the LOw Frequency ARray (LOFAR) astronomers took a closer look at the giant radio galaxy 3C 236. The observations, detailed in a paper published July 22 on the arXiv pre-print repository, shed more light on the morphology ...

ExoMars radio science instrument readied for Red Planet

An ambitious instrument for ESA's ExoMars 2020 mission has passed its testing in conditions resembling those on the Red Planet. It will now be transported to Russia for its acceptance review, followed by integration onto ...

Alternative material for superconducting radio-frequency cavity

In modern synchrotron sources and free-electron lasers, superconducting radio-frequency cavity resonators are able to supply electron bunches with extremely high energy. These resonators are currently constructed of pure ...

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Radio frequency

Radio frequency (RF) is a frequency or rate of oscillation within the range of about 3 Hz to 300 GHz. This range corresponds to frequency of alternating current electrical signals used to produce and detect radio waves. Since most of this range is beyond the vibration rate that most mechanical systems can respond to, RF usually refers to oscillations in electrical circuits.

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