Spinning quantum dots

The name 'quantum dots' is given to particles of semiconducting materials that are so tiny—a few nanometres in diameter—that they no longer behave quite like ordinary, macroscopic matter. Thanks to their quantum-like ...

Divorce in a one-dimensional world

In everyday objects, there is no left without right or front without back. Just as inseparable seem to be the electron's electric charge and its "spin." But in a strictly one-dimensional quantum world, both quantum properties ...

Building single-atom qubits under a microscope

Our team at IBM Research made a breakthrough in controlling the quantum behavior of individual atoms, demonstrating a versatile new building block for quantum computation.

The fast dance of electron spins

Metal complexes show a fascinating behavior in their interactions with light, which for example is utilized in organic light emitting diodes, solar cells, quantum computers, or even in cancer therapy. In many of these applications, ...

Quantum criticality could be a boon for qubit designers

Physicists studying the strange behavior of metal alloys called heavy fermions have made a surprising discovery that could be useful in safeguarding the information stored in quantum bits, or qubits, the basic units of encoded ...

Travelling towards a quantum internet at light speed

A research team lead by Osaka University demonstrated how information encoded in the circular polarization of a laser beam can be translated into the spin state of an electron in a quantum dot, each being a quantum bit and ...

Two-qubit gate: the speediest quantum operation yet

A group of scientists led by 2018 Australian of the Year Professor Michelle Simmons have achieved the first two-qubit gate between atom qubits in silicon—a major milestone on the team's quest to build an atom-scale quantum ...

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