Traditional computers can solve some quantum problems

There has been a lot of buzz about quantum computers and for good reason. The futuristic computers are designed to mimic what happens in nature at microscopic scales, which means they have the power to better understand the ...

Master equation to boost quantum technologies

As the size of modern technology shrinks down to the nanoscale, weird quantum effects—such as quantum tunneling, superposition, and entanglement—become prominent. This opens the door to a new era of quantum technologies, ...

A quantum pump without a crank

Pumps, in a nutshell, are devices that use cyclic motion to attain the steady transport of some cargo. In a bicycle pump, the repeated up and down strokes of a piston create air flow. In a Archimedean screw pump, water is ...

Ultracold atoms dressed by light simulate gauge theories

Our modern understanding of the physical world is based on gauge theories: mathematical models from theoretical physics that describe the interactions between elementary particles (such as electrons or quarks) and explain ...

Chemists unlock secrets of molten salts

A chemist at the University of Cincinnati has come up with a novel way to study the thermodynamic properties of molten salts, which are used in many nuclear and solar energy applications.

Scientists use quantum computers to simulate quantum materials

Quantum computers promise to revolutionize science by enabling computations that were once thought impossible. But for quantum computers to become an everyday reality, there is a long way to go with many challenging tests ...

Quantum systems and the flight of the bee

At first glance, a system consisting of 51 ions may appear easily manageable. But even if these charged atoms are only changed back and forth between two states, the result is more than two quadrillion (1015) different orderings ...

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