Carrot or stick? Game-theory can optimize collaboration

What motivates people to cooperate in collaborative endeavors? "First carrot, then stick". Tatsuya Sasaki, mathematician from the University of Vienna, has put forth for the first time ever a mathematical proof of this process. ...

Evolution: Social exclusion leads to cooperation

Social exclusion as a punishment strategy helps explain the evolution of cooperation, according to new research published today in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B.

Difficult-to-read font reduces political polarity, study finds

(Phys.org)—Liberals and conservatives who are polarized on certain politically charged subjects become more moderate when reading political arguments in a difficult-to-read font, researchers report in a new study. Likewise, ...

Punishment motivated by fairness, not revenge

Researchers at UCL (University College London) and Harvard University have found that we punish cheats only when they end up better off than us, in a study that challenges the notion that punishment is motivated by revenge.

Tax evaders prefer institutional punishment

(Phys.org) -- Selfish behaviour is a threat to successful coexistence and mutual cooperation. In many cases this human cooperation is based on punishing those who do not cooperate. There can be two different forms of punishment ...

When reputation is at stake, punishment becomes more responsible

(Phys.org) -- The evolution of cooperative behaviour in people is often explained by the fact that it provides the opportunity to punish undesirable behaviour. However, such punishment is costly and the benefits for the person ...

Punishment of egoistic behavior is not rewarded

The heated debate surrounding the German "state Trojan" software for the online monitoring of telecommunication between citizens shows that the concealed observation of our private decisions provokes public disapproval. However, ...

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