Related topics: protein

Enzyme prisons: Cell signaling with just one molecule

A team at the Max Dellbruck Center has answered a question that has puzzled scientists for some 40 years. In the journal Cell, the group explains how cells are able to switch on completely different signaling pathways using ...

Researchers take a fresh look at the Michaelis-Menten equation

Researchers from Aarhus University challenge one of the cornerstones of biochemistry, the Michaelis-Menten equation. They show that many enzymes in signaling pathways are independent of substrate concentration, because the ...

Ancient origins of allosteric activation in the oldest kinases

One of the key features in the evolution of more complex organisms is the emergence of allosteric regulation. Allostery is a process by which a protein's activity can be modulated by binding an effector molecule distal to ...

The arrestin-GPCR connection

G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the "inbox" of environmental messages in mammalian cells. Because of their central role in signaling pathways, mutations resulting in abnormal GPCR functions cause a wide variety of ...

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Protein kinase

A protein kinase is a kinase enzyme that modifies other proteins by chemically adding phosphate groups to them (phosphorylation). Phosphorylation usually results in a functional change of the target protein (substrate) by changing enzyme activity, cellular location, or association with other proteins. The human genome contains about 500 protein kinase genes and they constitute about 2% of all human genes. Protein kinases are also found in bacteria and plants. Up to 30% of all human proteins may be modified by kinase activity, and kinases are known to regulate the majority of cellular pathways, especially those involved in signal transduction.

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