Higher wheat yields and protein content on the horizon

A team of international researchers has discovered a way to produce higher quality wheat. The scientists from the University of Adelaide and the UK's John Innes Centre have identified a genetic driver that improves yield ...

Can insects get fat?

Insects don't have time to laze about—that's probably why we say someone is "as busy as a bee." But would an overfed and underactive bug find itself putting on weight like we do? We put this question to insect expert Erlend ...

The science of turning milk into cheese

The global production of sheep's milk is on the rise, and in the vast majority of cases used to produce cheese. However, a relatively large amount of milk is needed to produce it, so science is looking for ways to increase ...

Biodiversity's healthy byproduct—nutrient-rich seafood

High levels of biodiversity in aquatic settings offers a wide range of vitamins, minerals, and fatty acids crucial for human health, a range of nutrients that are lacking in ecosystems where the number of species have been ...

Creating 'green' protein from the air

Increasing environmental challenges have led scientists to rethink how protein can be produced. Traditional processes require a lot of space on land or sea, resulting in a high carbon footprint and reduced resources. A new ...

GmSWEET10a and GmSWEET10b coordinately regulate yield and quality

Cultivated soybeans were domesticated from wild soybeans in China over a period of 5,000 years, and then widely spread all over the world. Soybean has been a major, multiuse crop that globally makes up 56% of oilseed production ...

Bumble bees prefer a low-fat diet

Bees are an important factor for our environment and our sustenance. Without insect pollination, many plant species—including various crops—cannot reproduce. "Bee mortality therefore affects food supply for human beings," ...

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