Related topics: cells · protein · amino acids

Newly discovered protein operated in earliest organisms

Life on Earth depends on photosynthetic carbon dioxide (CO2) fixation to form organic carbon. Plants take atmospheric CO2 and transform it into organic molecules such as glucose. This process evolved in cyanobacteria and ...

Mechanical force controls the speed of protein synthesis

As cells create proteins, the proteins modulate synthesis speed by exerting a mechanical force on the molecular machine that makes them, according to a team of scientists who used a combination of computational and experimental ...

Chemists 'crystallize' new approach to materials science

A team of chemists at the University of California San Diego conducted breakthrough research for materials science—a field for which chemistry frequently provides information about the structure and composition of materials, ...

Cas3: a biological fishing rod and a shredder rolled into one

CRISPR-Cas9 has made gene editing a lot easier, and will eventually contribute to elimination of hereditary diseases from our DNA. But despite the fact that researchers use CRISPR-Cas9 and similar bacterial immune systems ...

Shaping proteins to understand chaperone-related diseases

Chaperones are a set of proteins that are specialised to assist proteins in the human body. They help proteins to fold to the right shape and protect them from adapting wrong shapes. The research group of Alireza Mashaghi, ...

Dynamics of microtubules

Filamentous polymers called microtubules play vital roles in chromosome segregation and molecular transport. An LMU team has now examined how microtubule lengths vary in response to changes in the availability of their protein ...

Mechanism vital to keeping blood stem cells functional uncovered

Hematopoietic stem cells, that form mature blood cells, require a very precise amount of protein to function – and defective regulation of protein production is common in certain types of aggressive human blood cancers. ...

Unpacking a secret of photosynthesis

Researchers at University of Stavanger have brought us one step closer to solving the fundamental question how plants build the photosynthetic machinery.

page 9 from 23