Electron beam melting gets brittle metal into shape

Tungsten has the highest melting point of all metals, 3,422 degrees Celsius. This makes the material ideal for use at high temperatures in e.g. space rocket nozzles, heating elements of high-temperature furnaces, or the fusion ...

Physicists create 3-D printed microboat

From prow to stern, this little boat measures 30 micrometers, about a third of the thickness of a hair. It has been 3-D-printed by Leiden physicists Rachel Doherty, Daniela Kraft and colleagues.

Energy-harvesting plastics pass the acid test

A polymer previously used to protect solar cells may find new applications in consumer electronics, reveals a KAUST team studying thin films capable of converting thermal energy into electricity.

Researchers develop low-cost, drop-on-demand printing technique

Researchers at the Center for Nano Science and Engineering (CeNSE), IISc, have developed a low-cost, drop-on-demand printing technique capable of generating a wide range of droplet sizes using a variety of inks. Apart from ...

Thin-skinned solar panels printed with inkjet

Solar cells can now be made so thin, light and flexible that they can rest on a soap bubble. The new cells, which efficiently capture energy from light, could offer an alternative way to power novel electronic devices, such ...

A wearable, freestanding electrochemical sensing system

In a new study published on Science Advances, Yichao Zhao and a research team in integrated bioelectronics and materials and engineering in the U.S. engineered a disposable, free-standing electrochemical sensing system (FESS). ...

Tough, flexible sensor invented for wearable tech

Researchers have used 3-D printing and nanotechnology to create a durable, flexible sensor for wearable devices to monitor everything from vital signs to athletic performance.

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