A new way to measure how water moves

When a chemical spills in the environment, it's important to know how quickly the spill will spread. If a farmer irrigates a crop, the person will need to know how fast the water should move through the soil and be absorbed ...

Nanoporous material nets contaminant from water

Barely visible material that looks like tiny grains of sand may hold the key to removing an invisible health threat that has contaminated water supplies across the country. Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory ...

Nuclear pore complex outer rings: No longer 'one size fits all'

In eukaryotic cells, the nucleus is walled off from the rest of the cell by the nuclear envelope. All transport into and out of the nucleus occurs via cylindrical channels called nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) that penetrate ...

Let's mimic termite nests to keep human buildings cool

When it comes to building sustainable buildings, humans have a lot to learn from termites. A recent study that colleagues and I published in Science Advances explains how some African termites maintain cool and stable temperatures ...

Flies smell through a Gore-Tex system

A research group led by a scientist of the RIKEN Center for Biosystems Dynamics Research (BDR) has gained important insights into the nanopores that allow the fruit fly to detect chemicals in the air, and has identified the ...

Self-sorting through molecular geometries

Researchers at Kanazawa University report in Communications Chemistry that certain pentagonal and hexagonal organic molecules exhibit self-sorting. The effect can be used to grow multilayered tubular structures that preserve ...

Structure of fossil-fuel source rocks is finally decoded

The fossil fuels that provide much of the world's energy orginate in a type of rock known as kerogen, and the potential for recovering these fuels depends crucially on the size and connectedness of the rocks' internal pore ...

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