Disappearing rice fields threaten more global warming

All over China, a huge change has been taking place without any of us noticing. Rice paddies have been (and are being) converted at an astonishing rate into aquaculture ponds to produce more protein for the worlds growing ...

How bacteria can prevent coal ash spills

Researchers from North Carolina State University have developed a technique that uses bacteria to produce "biocement" in coal ash ponds, making the coal ash easier to store and limiting the risk of coal ash spills into surface ...

Pond water reveals tropical frogs

Globally, there are almost 7,000 species of frogs, the majority of which occur in the tropics. In order to systematically survey their distribution and detect population trends, experts until recently had to stake out the ...

Beavers have an impact on the climate

Growing beaver populations have created a large number of new habitats along rivers and ponds. Beaver dams raise the water level, enabling the dissolution of the organic carbon from the soil. From beaver ponds, carbon is ...

page 1 from 11

Pond

A pond is a body of standing water, either natural or man-made, that is usually smaller than a lake. A wide variety of man-made bodies of water are classified as ponds, including water gardens, water features and koi ponds; all designed for aesthetic ornamentation as landscape or architectural features, while fish ponds are designed for commercial fish breeding, and solar ponds designed to store thermal energy.

Standing bodies of water such as puddles, ponds, and lakes are distinguished from a water course, such as a brook, creek, or stream via current speed. While currents in streams are more easily observed, ponds and lakes possess thermally driven microcurrents and moderate wind-driven currents. These features distinguish a pond from many other aquatic terrain features, such as stream pools and tide pools.

Some mills use the kinetic energy of the moving water in the pond to generate electricity.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA