Related topics: solar cells

The ink of the future in printed electronics

A research group led by Simone Fabiano at the Laboratory of Organic Electronics, Linköping University, has created an organic material with superb conductivity that doesn't need to be doped. They have achieved this by mixing ...

An artificial sunflower that bends toward the sun

A team of researchers from the University of California and Arizona State University has found a way to create a material that demonstrates tropistic behavior. In their paper published in the journal Nature Nanotechnology, ...

Flexible circuits for 3-D printing

A research collaborative between the University of Hamburg and DESY has developed a process suitable for 3-D printing that can be used to produce transparent and mechanically flexible electronic circuits. The electronics ...

New light shed on intensely studied material

The organic polymer PEDOT is one of the world's most intensely studied materials. Despite this, researchers at Linköping University have now demonstrated that the material functions in a completely different manner than ...

Scientists develop promising new type of polymer

Organic polymers are used in solar cells, sensors, LEDs and in many other devices. One specific type of polymer, S-PPV, was previously regarded as promising in theory, but almost impossible to produce from a technical perspective. ...

Doubling the efficiency of organic electronics

Researchers from Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, have discovered a simple new tweak that could double the efficiency of organic electronics. OLED-displays, plastic-based solar cells and bioelectronics are just ...

The promise of deep grooves

A manufacturing technique that could help the semiconductor industry make more powerful computer chips began in the humblest of places—at a lunch table at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory.

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