Angry politicians make angry voters, new study finds

Politicians may have good reason to turn to angry rhetoric, according to research led by political scientists from Colorado—the strategy seems to work, at least in the short term.

Politically polarized brains share an intolerance of uncertainty

Since the 1950s, political scientists have theorized that political polarization—increased numbers of "political partisans" who view the world with an ideological bias—is associated with an inability to tolerate uncertainty ...

What caused the U.S. anti-science trend?

Is the pandemic the most important election issue this year? That depends on whom you ask. Those who say that it is tend to favor overwhelmingly (82 percent) Joseph R. Biden, the Democratic Party nominee, yet only 24 percent ...

Dead people don't vote: Study points to an 'extremely rare' fraud

With concerns rising over a potentially contested presidential election next week, a new study by Stanford researchers suggests that worries over one type of election-day fraud are overblown: ballots cast in the name of dead ...

Projecting favorable perceptions of space

For anthropologists and other social scientists, the space race in the 1950s served as a period of cultural and technological transformation as well as an opportunity to advance the public good. Space exploration marked a ...

To cut food waste, we may need to pay more for what we eat

How can we reduce food waste? Although the Swiss population are aware of the problem, they misjudge where most food waste is generated, ETH political scientists conclude. The general public support cutting food waste, even ...

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