Chance, not ideology, drives political polarization

Ever-widening divisions between Democrats and Republicans are believed to reflect deeply rooted ideological differences, but a new study points to a radically different interpretation: it may be mostly a matter of luck.

Thanks to big data, US parties know all about voters

If you're an American voter and have provided personal information to a company, chances are data groups have shared it with political parties to help them target potential supporters.

Should a political party form a coalition? Voters and math decide

Mathematical ideas and tools are often used to describe aspects of large macroscopic systems. Examples abound in areas as varied as finance to psychology. In a paper published last month in the SIAM Journal on Applied Mathematics, ...

Special interest groups bipartisan in Congress, scholar finds

Contrary to common perception, special interest groups are not responsible for the partisan division in Congress - and often join bipartisan coalitions to support legislation, according to a Michigan State University political ...

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