Why poison frogs don't poison themselves

Don't let their appearance fool you: Thimble-sized, dappled in cheerful colors and squishy, poison frogs in fact harbor some of the most potent neurotoxins we know. With a new paper published in the journal Science, scientists ...

Green poison-dart frog varies mating call to suit situation

In the eyes of a female poison-dart frog, a red male isn't much brighter than a green one. This does not however mean that the mating behavior of the green and red variants of the same species of frog is exactly the same. ...

A newly discovered chemical weapon in poison frogs' arsenal

New research documents a surprising chemical weapon used by some Amazonian poison frogs. The study identified for the first time a family of poisons never before known to exist in these brightly colored creatures or elsewhere ...

Using poison-frog compounds to control fire ants

Since its accidental introduction into the United States from South America in the 1930s, the red imported fire ant, Solenopsis invicta, has spread throughout the southern United States, decimating small-animal populations, ...

Amazonian amphibian diversity traced to Andes

Colorful poison frogs in the Amazon owe their great diversity to ancestors that leapt into the region from the Andes Mountains several times during the last 10 million years, a new study from The University of Texas at Austin ...

Demand for exotic pets pushes species to the brink

Poisonous frogs, long-necked turtles, bears and chimpanzees may not be everyone's idea of an animal companion, but experts warn that demand for exotic pets is pushing some species closer to extinction.

page 1 from 2