Possible new hope for crops battling parasitic infection

Scientists from Ghent University and VIB (The Flemisch Institute for Biotechnology) have demonstrated how nematodes, also known as roundworms, manipulate the transport of the plant hormone auxin in order to force the plant ...

Unlocking the mystery on how plant leaves grow their teeth

Plant biologists at ITbM, Nagoya University have discovered the key element, an EPFL2 peptide that is responsible for creating the teeth-like shapes on plant leaves. The zigzag edges of leaves, so-called leaf teeth, are important ...

How plants counteract against the shade of larger neighbors

Plants that "lose the battle" during competitiveness for light because they are shaded by larger neighbours, counteract. They adapt by rapid shoot elongation and stretch their leaves towards the sun. The molecular basis of ...

Groundwork for playing with the architecture of plants

Growing tomatoes at the same height so that they can be easily picked by a harvesting robot. Growing deeper roots where the soil is dry. These types of changes to plant architecture may well be enabled in the future thanks ...

Sensor important to understanding root, seedling development

A biosensor utilizing black platinum and carbon nanotubes developed at Purdue University will help give scientists a better understanding of how the plant hormone auxin regulates root growth and seedling establishment.

How plants' vascular cells turn into holes

Theoretical biologists have solved a unique puzzle in the structure of plants' vascular tissue. Two mutations that had opposite effects appear to lead to the same result. Professor of Computational Developmental Biology Kirsten ...

Newly discovered regulation process explains plant development

Vascular tissue in plants distributes water and nutrients, thereby ensuring constant growth. Each new cell needs to develop into its respective cell type in the vascular tissue. A team at the Technical University of Munich ...

Sugar responsible for shoot branching in plants

(Phys.org) —A University of Queensland study has overturned the long-held belief that plant hormones control the shape of plant growth, and shown instead that this process starts with sugar.

Signaling pathways to the nucleus

A team of researchers from the University of Freiburg have discovered how the plant hormone auxin is transported within cells and how this signaling pathway helps to control gene expression in the nucleus. Auxin regulates ...

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