Related topics: titanium dioxide

Researchers discover new charge transfer and separation process

Charge transfer and separation is a fundamental process in the energy conversion that powers life on Earth. Besides deployment in solar cells and photocatalysts, this process is found in photosynthesis, as it enables energy ...

Nanodiamonds as photocatalysts

Climate change is in full swing and will continue unabated as long as CO2 emissions continue. One possible solution is to return CO2 to the energy cycle: CO2 could be processed with water into methanol, a fuel that can be ...

Chemists test a new nanocatalyst for obtaining hydrogen

A chemist from RUDN was the first to use catalysts with ruthenium nanoparticles to obtain hydrogen under the influence of visible light and UV radiation. In the future, such catalysts may be used for large-scale production ...

Converting carbon dioxide into methane or ethane selectively

A research team led by Professor Su-Il In from Department of Energy Science and Engineering has succeeded in developing photo catalysts that can convert carbon dioxide into usable energy such as methane or ethane.

Reducing CO2 with common elements and sunlight

An international collaborative research group including Tokyo Institute of Technology, Universite PARIS DIDEROT and CNRS has discovered that CO2 is selectively reduced to CO when a photocatalyst composed of an organic semiconductor ...

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Photocatalysis

In chemistry, photocatalysis is the acceleration of a photoreaction in the presence of a catalyst. In catalysed photolysis, light is absorbed by an adsorbed substrate. In photogenerated catalysis, the photocatalytic activity (PCA) depends on the ability of the catalyst to create electron–hole pairs, which generate free radicals (hydroxyl radicals: ·OH) able to undergo secondary reactions. Its comprehension has been made possible ever since the discovery of water electrolysis by means of the titanium dioxide. Commercial application of the process is called advanced oxidation process (AOP). There are several methods of achieving AOP's, that can but do not necessarily involve TiO2 or even the use of UV light. Generally the defining factor is the production and use of the hydroxyl radical.

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