Six years in 120 pages: Researchers shed light on Ricci flows

Differential geometry is the study of space geometry. Multiple natural phenomena, from universal expansion to thermal expansion and contraction, can come down to spatial evolution. The two core conjectures in this field, ...

Great progress for electronic gadgets of the future

Researchers at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) have found a completely new method to check the electronic properties of oxide materials. This opens the door to even tinier components and perhaps ...

Cherned up to the maximum

In topological materials, electrons can display behavior that is fundamentally differentfrom that in 'conventional' matter, and the magnitude of many such 'exotic' phenomena is directly proportional to an entity known as ...

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Phenomenon

A phenomenon (from Greek φαινόμενoν), plural phenomena, is any observable occurrence. Phenomena are often, but not always, understood as 'appearances' or 'experiences'. These are themselves sometimes understood as involving qualia.

The term came into its modern philosophical usage through Immanuel Kant, who contrasted it with noumenon (for which he used the term Ding an sich, or "thing-in-itself"), which, in contrast to phenomena, are not directly accessible to observation. Kant was heavily influenced by Leibniz in this part of his philosophy, in which phenomenon and noumenon serve as interrelated technical terms.

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