New genes out of nothing

One key question in evolutionary biology is how novel genes arise and develop. Swedish researchers now show how new genes and functions that are advantageous to bacteria can be selected from random DNA sequences. The results ...

Ants surrender their venomous secrets

Venoms produced by snails, snakes, scorpions and spiders contain numerous bioactive compounds that could lead to therapeutic drugs or insect-specific pesticides. Yet little is known about venoms produced by insects, in part ...

Double-bridged peptides bind any disease target

Peptides are short chains of amino acids that can bind to proteins and change their function. They show high binding affinity, low toxicity, and are easy to synthesize, all of which makes peptides ideal for use in drug development, ...

Modified biomaterials self-assemble on temperature cues

Biomedical engineers from Duke University have demonstrated a new approach to making self-assembled biomaterials that relies on protein modifications and temperature. The hybrid approach allows researchers to control self-assembly ...

Hydrogel heals without additives

Sometimes when you're invested in a project you fail to notice things that turn out to be significant.

Encoding smart antibiotics

A method for designing antibiotics based on random binary encoding, developed by a team led by the National Physical Laboratory (NPL), could open up new opportunities in drug discovery.

page 1 from 3