Chili peppers help to unravel the mechanism of pain

Capsaicin, the active ingredient in chili peppers, is most often experienced as an irritant, but it may also be used to reduce pain. A new work published by Drs. Feng Qin and Jing Yao in this week's PLoS Biology uses capsaicin ...

From cone snail venom to pain relief

Conotoxins are bioactive peptides found in the venom that marine cone snails produce for prey capture and defense. They are used as pharmacological tools to study pain signalling and have the potential to become a new class ...

Painkillers relieve zebrafish larvae discomfort

Lynne Sneddon is a myth buster. Having debunked the fisherman's legend that fish don't feel pain, Sneddon, from the University of Liverpool, UK, has become a leading figure in the movement to reduce, replace and refine the ...

Intractable pain may find relief in tiny gold rods

A team of scientists at Kyoto University's Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences (iCeMS) has developed a novel technique using tiny gold rods to target pain receptors.

Treating pain by blocking the 'chili-pepper receptor'

Biting into a chili pepper causes a burning spiciness that is irresistible to some, but intolerable to others. Scientists exploring the chili pepper's effect are using their findings to develop a new drug candidate for many ...

Nobel pioneers unlocked the cell door

For most of the 20th century, scientists were puzzled by how cells in our body are able to sense and react to external conditions.

Fight or flight and the evolution of pain

Hard wired into the survival mechanisms of all animals is the perception of pain. Different stimuli, such as heat or cold, foul odors, chemicals or a blunt blow can trigger pain receptors in the body that, in the blink of ...

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