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Correcting historic sea surface temperature measurements

Something odd happened in the oceans in the early 20th century. The North Atlantic and Northeast Pacific appeared to warm twice as much as the global average while the Northwest Pacific cooled over several decades.

Video: Friend or foe? Fun facts about sharks

Sharks often get a bad rap, even though most species are harmless to humans, says Katherine Maslenikov, manager of the UW Fish Collection at the Burke Museum.

Image: European Service Module 2 assembly

The European Service Module-2 (ESM-2) is somewhat like the portal it appears to be in this image. By providing power and propulsion for the Orion spacecraft, it will transport humans back to the Moon, roughly fifty years ...

NASA catches Post Tropical Cyclone Cosme fading

Tropical Storm Cosme formed in the Eastern Pacific Ocean over the weekend of July 6 and 7 and after two days, the storm already weakened to a remnant low pressure area. NASA's Aqua satellite found the storm devoid of strong ...

NASA-NOAA satellite catches Hurricane Barbara's closing eye

Hurricane Barbara continued to track west through the Eastern Pacific Ocean when NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed overhead on July 4. Satellite imagery revealed clouds filling into Barbara's eye as wind shear continued ...

Indian Ocean causes drought and heatwaves in South America

New research has found the record-breaking South American drought of 2013/14 with its succession of heatwaves and long lasting marine heatwave had its origins in a climate event half a world away—over the Indian Ocean.

Barbara now a major hurricane on NASA satellite imagery

NASA's Terra and Aqua satellites passed over the Eastern Pacific Ocean after Tropical Storm Barbara strengthened into the first hurricane of the season. Barbara intensified rapidly into a major hurricane.

Chile, Argentina prepare for spectacular solar eclipse

Day will briefly turn to night Tuesday over large parts of Chile and Argentina as a total eclipse of the Sun plunges a vast swath of the southern Pacific and the cone of South America into darkness.

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Pacific Ocean

The Pacific Ocean is the largest of the Earth's oceanic divisions. Its name is derived from the Latin name Mare Pacificum, "peaceful sea", bestowed upon it by the Portuguese explorer Ferdinand Magellan. It extends from the Arctic in the north to Antarctica in the south, bounded by Asia and Australia in the west, and the Americas in the east. At 169.2 million square kilometres (65.3 million square miles) in area, this largest division of the World Ocean – and, in turn, the hydrosphere – covers about 46% of the Earth's water surface and about 32% of its total surface area, making it larger than all of the Earth's land area combined. The equator subdivides it into the North Pacific Ocean and South Pacific Ocean, with two exceptions: the Galápagos and Gilbert Islands are deemed wholly within the South Pacific. The Mariana Trench in the western North Pacific is the deepest point in the Pacific and in the world, reaching a depth of 10,911 metres (35,798 ft).

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA