French oyster farmers fume as norovirus shuts down sales

Several oyster farmers along France's Atlantic and Mediterranean coasts have been forced to halt sales since December after their sites were contaminated by the highly contagious norovirus, which they blame on overflowing ...

Pearls of wisdom

Since the late 19th century, pearl aquaculture has been a revered industry in Japan, enabling widespread cultivation and commercialization of beautiful pearls. From a genetic and evolutionary perspective, scientists have ...

Chesapeake Bay oysters get more attention at pivotal time

Robert T. Brown pulled an oyster shell from a pile freshly harvested by a dredger from the Chesapeake Bay and talked enthusiastically about the larvae attached—a sign of a future generation critical to the health of the ...

Oyster deaths: American slipper limpet is innocent

Natural history collections are unique archives of biodiversity. They document how living things transform over time and what effects aspects like climate change or other man-made environmental changes have on their distribution. ...

Louisiana hopes to fight coast erosion by mimicking nature

Back when the Mississippi River flowed wild, its ever-shifting waters acted as a continent-sized earth mover, picking up sand and dirt from the North, depositing it in the Delta region and eventually creating the land that ...

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Oyster

The word oyster is used as a common name for a number of distinct groups of bivalve molluscs which live in marine or brackish habitats. The valves are highly calcified.

Some kinds of oyster are commonly consumed, cooked or raw, by humans. Other kinds, such as pearl oysters, are not. These are considered an aphrodisiac.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA