Scientists finger culprits decimating France's oysters

A two-pronged attack by a virus and bacteria is responsible for decimating France's 450-million euro ($520 million) oyster industry, scientists said Thursday, potentially solving a decade-long mystery.

Oysters at risk from changing climate

Climate change's effect on coastal ecosystems is very likely to increase mortality risks of adult oyster populations in the next 20 years.

Oysters: one animal, two glues

Oysters build extensive reef communities by cementing to one another early in their lives. Scientists have known they secrete an adhesive for this purpose, but new research shows the glue they make as babies and juveniles ...

Oysters close their shells in response to low-frequency sounds

Oysters rapidly close their shells in response to low-frequency sounds characteristic of marine noise pollution, according to a study published October 25, 2017 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Jean-Charles Massabuau ...

Chesapeake Bay pollution extends to early 19th century

Humans began measurably and negatively impacting water quality in the Chesapeake Bay in the first half of the 19th century, according to a study of eastern oysters by researchers at The University of Alabama.

After Deepwater Horizon spill, oyster size did not change

Contrary to their own scientific intuition, Cornell researchers found that the body size of intertidal oysters didn't change after the Deepwater Horizon oil spill disaster in the Gulf of Mexico. This offers evidence that ...

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Oyster

The word oyster is used as a common name for a number of distinct groups of bivalve molluscs which live in marine or brackish habitats. The valves are highly calcified.

Some kinds of oyster are commonly consumed, cooked or raw, by humans. Other kinds, such as pearl oysters, are not. These are considered an aphrodisiac.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA